Berries are also strange.

I still feel as though my new garden belongs to someone else. It has some lovely elements gl strawberry barrel crop just plantedand I’m awfully thankful that I was able to accomplish it, but the circumstances surrounding its creation were not ideal for creating the space I really wanted. Just starting out on my lonesome own, in my shaken-up existence without my husband, I knew that I did not like the old arrangement — that is, the swimming pool — that was obviously not Me, because it had never been. How to get what I did want, given the limits of my suburban lot and of my financial means, and most importantly, my mental wherewithal that had been reduced to Where?

My creative self was a room all in disarray from a crazy person rummaging around trying to find something. The cupboards doors left hanging open and random items spilling out or fallen on the floor: Oh, here is a piece of orange cloth…yes, that’s right, I like the color orange… and there is one of Pearl’s plums that are so yummy… get me a couple of those trees.

From a place of more understanding six months later I can say: I wanted to be plopped down into the gardens of an old Mediterranean villa where no plants were younger than ten years, and at least two full-time and expert gardeners and groundskeepers were always on hand to do the work, leaving me at leisure to walk or sit in the garden, to pray and read and watch the birds.

It helps to shine this light on the amusing and fantastical nature of my desires so that I can laugh at them and get to work on what is really here. One of the real tasks was planting the strawberry barrels. This was an idea that Landscape Lady found in a magazine and gave me the instructions for; I would never have conceived it myself, but it was an okay idea. It has been one of the few projects that I’ve completed almost entirely on my own, doggedly.

I shopped at several stores before choosing my barrels, and brought them home and sat them in the driveway with all the other junk and clutter that overflowed the demolition/construction area. Then began the string of dirt-moving episodes:

1) Reserve an appropriate portion of the dirt designated for the general landscaping by shoveling it into the barrels.

2) After several weeks, decide on a color to paint the barrels and the playhouse, and

3) Take all the dirt out of the barrels and put it on a tarp while I spray paint them on the dead lawn.

4) Until they get holes drilled, I don’t want to put the dirt back in, so I set them in the back gl IMG_0876yard to wait, and pull the tarp around the dirt in the driveway so the rain doesn’t soak it.

5) After two sons-in-law drill the holes on Thanksgiving weekend, I move the barrels to their spot by the playhouse and drag the tarp back there and replace the dirt — not before it dawns on me that the holes all around the sides for the strawberries to grow out of will be holes that the dirt will also flow out of. What? I look back at the article and see that it calls for non-soil planting mix. Too late for that, so I put some newsprint over the holes inside before I shovel the dirt in. Wait for February when bare-root plants are available.

2016-02-15 17.22.35
Bundle of 25 strawberry plants

6) Landscape Lady says that the soil for the drought-tolerant ornamentals is not rich enough for the strawberries, so before I plant I must dig in some compost. I put that on my shopping list.

7) February comes, and the bare-root plants are bought, but the nursery is out of the compost, so I shop at another store to get it. The bale is too heavy for me to lift into my cart, so I get help with that, but after I check out no one answers the call to help me, so I manage to tip it into my Subaru and then out again at home into my garden cart and into the back yard next to the barrels. Whew.

8) By this time I have read several articles about strawberries and barrels and I realize that I should have tackled this whole project differently (though if I had had that much sense back then, I would have said No to the whole thing). I need to take all the dirt out again and mix in the compost, and then add just enough back to come up to the level of the bottom row of holes, lay the plants on top of that with their bare roots extending toward the center like hair on a pillow, cover them up with enough dirt to reach the next level of planting holes, and so forth.

9) The old pap2016-02-16 10.47.31er blocking the holes has become mulch. I decide as I’m completing the project that I should have bought some peat moss to tuck in around the root crowns to keep the dirt from escaping, but now I’m in the middle of it, and just cut some new pieces of newsprint to go around the plants. I will get some peat moss later and tuck it in after the fact.

Part of the reason this was not as fun as I normally find gardening to be is that it is too contrived. Non-soil planting mix? Trying to defy gravity? But I did it, on behalf of that strange woman who was presented with this idea back in September and said, “Why not?” The woman I am would just throw some California poppy seeds around the play house and let them bloom where they will for the children to pick.

A few days later, rain has soaked the barrels and we’ll probably see more leaves poking out soon. The weather will cool again, but the temperature won’t drop to January levels, and in a few months there will be fruit hanging out of the holes. If the grandchildren aren’t around to pick strawberries, I’ll put out a sign for the blue jays to help themselves.

gl yard IMG_1761
Taken just now through the window and the raindrops.

 

 

15 thoughts on “Berries are also strange.

  1. What a delightful space you are developing! I’m rather enjoying the picture journey. Hearing about your processes makes me feel a little better about my own. We are going about our greenhouse a bit backwardsly…we have the seeds, trays, soil mix, and heating elements. We just need to fix the actual greenhouse to use it! 🙂

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  2. What interesting perspective the photo from upstairs has. I like the image of you tossing seeds (words do make pictures). I suspect you and time will soften this palette in myriad ways. The essence herein is so beyond the garden….love to you.

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  3. I admire your determination to remake that space into one that looks forward to your new life (of self and of nature) when you could have settled for preserving and memorializing family history. That’s probably better done with stories, photographs, and memory itself. I was inspired, once again, by reading here.

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  4. I am sure it will be lovely in spite of the set back. I think your description of your mental health is a wonderful description of how I feel now. I have gone through some terrible issues in the last few months, and keep trying to find my way back. I realize reading your description, I just need to shut the cupboards of my mind and let things be. I think your garden is just lovely. I think I will always have a garden in my mind, and then there is the real one that exists today. I love your strawberry barrels by the way.

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  5. Ahhahahahah,  Joanna you are so funny!  Seriously, the yard looks good and you’ll be rewarded for your labors. You’ve had a hard year and just doing something was helping you cope…you can change things around later.

    Leslie 

    PS  strawberry jam?

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  6. Whew, I’m dizzy after all that! Much too ambitious a project for the likes of me. But it will be lovely when the berries start ripening. I love that little playhouse with the two child-sized chairs and the tiny little stepping stones up to the front door.

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  7. Those are going to be some well-earned strawberries for sure! Your backyard garden looks wonderful.

    I laughed about your imagined gardening help. I often have such fantasies about housework help; then I realize I just need to get up and do it myself!

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