Grass and turmeric and some same old (sweet) things.

Today I’m wondering what this grassy “weed” is, along a stretch of path by the creek that didn’t get mown down – yet? It’s very familiar, and I guessed it was rye, but I can’t match it up with anything in Weeds of the West at this stage. Maybe when the seed heads develop, if it is allowed to remain.

The Queen Anne’s Lace that made such a lush display last year was removed on my side of the creek, but there are a couple of plants starting to bloom on this far side:

Thursday I worked in the kitchen and cooked up a storm the whole day long. I hardly did anything else. Every other Thursday my CSA box (farm box) gets delivered, so I had that to deal with. I made some more of the Egg Bhurji, a sort of Indian scramble, and got the flavors closer to my goal. This time I grated fresh turmeric into it because I had it on hand. I had bought the turmeric rhizomes to plant, but there were more of them than I needed for that.

I boiled the quail eggs. They were so darling at every stage, I even had to take pictures of them simmering in the pot. One place I read said to cook them for two minutes, another four minutes, so I think I had them in the pan for about three minutes, and the yolks are soft, but that’s very pretty, too! And they are very tasty. 14 calories and 1.2g protein each.

Last Sunday when I saw them as the love offering on that bench, it was amazing how instantaneous was the progression in my mind to the thought, “I could raise quail!” Ha! I did laugh at myself. It’s not beyond the realm of possibility, and it would be easier than chickens, but I want to get started on raising worms as my next homesteading project.

Now that the temperature has been in the 80’s the sweet peas are exploding; one day I took bouquets to two different neighbors, and the next day I filled two vases for my own house. Soon the stems will be too short to do much with, and I need to take them out anyway, to make room for the butternut squash that I will train up the trellis.

Some pretty blooms in the house are the Nodding Violet or Streptocarpella, a species of Streptocarpus, which a friend and I agreed sounds like a flower to feed a dinosaur with a sore throat. But they don’t make that many flowers that I want to offer them to the sick, so I think I will forget about the dinosaur and just remember Nodding Violet.

Mrs. Bread gave me my first plant, from which I accidentally broke a stem that I rooted into a second plant; I gave that second plant to friend Ann at church.  Then my violet was struck down by cold in the greenhouse one winter’s day, but by then Ann had started a second plant which she gave to me. And that is how we take care of each other and of our Nodding Violets, and how I am learning to just keep them safe in the house. They are nodding “Yes” to that:

And in the back garden, the red California poppies are blooming under the (fruitless) plum trees. Mr. Greenjeans said that the warm weather we had a few months ago confused the plums and made them bloom early; then the frost hit and destroyed the buds. 😦 So he doesn’t have any plums, either. This is the third year for my plums and I ate one last year.

Considering how little attention I have given my strawberries, and the fact that they are old plants, it is a big surprise to me that they are so happy and productive this spring. This morning I picked eight fruits to bring into the house, which might set a record, but that could be because in the past I have eaten them all in the garden.

I hope your June is starting out as happy as mine. ❤

7 thoughts on “Grass and turmeric and some same old (sweet) things.

  1. I’m SO happy you’re so happy, Sweetheart. Your gardening efforts are really paying off! Miss you and will see you on Sunday 7/1 at church!

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  2. There may have been only 8 strawberries in your garden but they are perfect. No bird came to peck at them (Robins are often the guilty ones).

    I hope someone will help identify your plant that may or may not be rye.

    I like the Nodding violet. I used to have a Streptocarpus. It lived quite a long time but eventually died. I should have cut off and rooted a baby one while it was doing well.

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  3. Your strawberries look so very delicious! I would’ve eaten them in the garden myself 🙂 I’m wondering about that turmeric, and how it tastes, grated straight in the dish. Pretty cool! The quail egg looks quite perfect — creamy inside. So much yolk for such a slim white.

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  4. Oh, how I love the flowers of Queen Anne’s Lace. It pops up in my garden here and I love it’s delicate white flowerheads and its dry umbels when those flowers are done. Your strawberries look delicious. I don’t have much success with strawberries unfortunately. Meg:)

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  5. You have made me hungry. Let’s see what I have for lunch. I do prefer the fresh tumeric. I keep it in the freezer with my fresh ginger and grate as needed. Spent the morning in the book of Tobit. Have you read it? Have adopted a dog who has not been taken care of properly. He has been renamed Toby. Fun book! Love you and how your blog inspires me.

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