A gathering of godmothers.

As I was scrubbing and shining the windows on a brisk afternoon, I made peace with myself over the tea party. Housemate Susan and I had planned one since the middle of Advent, but as the date grew closer the argument played in my mind, about whether it was ridiculous to take on another project right now, or perfectly sensible.

Now I knew it was worth it, because otherwise I don’t know when I’d have gotten around to the windows. And cleaning around the lower reaches of the kitchen, etc. The day before, I remembered that I like to use my vintage white napkins at tea parties, and I actually located them upstairs, where every room but Susan’s is dreadfully chaotic for reasons I’ll go into later. I ironed about ten soft cloths with help from a spray bottle of water infused with lemongrass oil. Happiness.

What about a centerpiece for the table? I was using my birds-and-forest table runner, which made me think to check by the creek for some berries and conifer branches, of which I brought home a bagful. All of that had been washed by rain, but was still fresh enough that not one berry fell off.

In the early stages of our idea, the party had been named a Godmother Party. I wanted very much to have the female members of Susan’s goddaughter Gigi’s family, and then it followed naturally to invite my three goddaughters who live in the area, and my godmother, and the godmother of my goddaughter’s sister… and so it went. Not everyone could come in the end, but it was a beautiful time. The little girls got to play outside in the playhouse a bit; the grownup ladies enjoyed a relaxing cup of Christmas tea, near the cheery fire of oak logs that Susan carefully tended. No rush.

Of tea, we had three pots full. “Joyous Jasmine” green tea came from Brewlette, a hipster sort of Indian source you can find on Facebook, in a gift pack from Kate. That was the most flowery, aromatic tea I have ever experienced.

We had a strong black tea from Russia, which came in this churchly tin, and another delicious and festive blend named “Nutcracker Rooibos” — The children drank that as it is caffeine-free.

Cookies, peanut brittle, mini-quiches, chocolates, fancy nuts, and thick slices of my dense Swedish sourdough rye, with plenty of butter. I haven’t mentioned yet the lemony Greek butter cookie twists that Susan made, but you can see below how cute they are.

‘Twas a Fifth Day of Christmas feast!

10 thoughts on “A gathering of godmothers.

  1. Look at your beautiful plate of cookies! What a lovely idea to have that party. At Christmas people love it when others plan a small(ish) gathering like that, where you are comfortable and relaxed with others you know in a friend’s home. So nice. Your china is very pretty.

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  2. I so wish I could have attended! It looks like you had a great time. I am still down with this terrible cold, but my spirits were lifted with your post!

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  3. How lovely your table looks with the pretty runner and nature-themed centerpiece.

    The food also looks so good. Nice that it was such a success.

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  4. So this is what all the baking was for! Your table setting looks so inviting – as does the fare. What a lovely idea this is! Rooibos originates in South Africa – glad you enjoyed it.

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  5. This post sure makes me wish I had learned to drink tea, and that I had been invited to the tea! Your cookie plate is astonishing in its Gourmet magazine perfection and I do love your birds and forest table runner.

    I love the title of this post!

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