The beginning of a true newness

I am somewhat apologetically writing already another post on The Hidden Art of Homemaking, because it is the philosophy and theology, the heavenly underpinnings perhaps, that inspire me and give me the energy to carry out the practical details. From looking at the chapter titles it seems that this introductory chapter might be the one about which I have the most musings.

As to the oddness of me taking my inspiration from yet another man, when it is we women who traditionally do the homemaking and who are discussing a woman‘s book, I will just say that, Christ who enables us also was a man, and the Life of The Holy Trinity is something greater than our gender roles. The reality of the Holy Spirit operating in the world through us is our means of living out our humanity. Homemaking is one of the many facets of our calling and our life in God, and this particular pastor always encourages me in the fact of “Christ in you, the hope of glory.”

The passages from Metropolitan Anthony are from a talk on Genesis given in June, 1986, from the book Metropolitan Anthony of Sourozh: Essential Writings by Gillian Crow.

Creativeness, however, is something more complex than the ability to call out new forms, to shape one’s surroundings or even to determine to a certain extent…our destiny. It begins with the ability to change — to change intentionally. Creativeness begins with the ability a being has…to become what he is not yet, to start at the point at which he was created and then grow into a fullness that he did not possess before: from image to likeness, if you will — having begun to be, as it were, a reflection, to become the reality itself; having begun to be in the image of the invisible Creator, to become the image of God incarnate.

…And this process is a creative process. It is not an organic one; it is not something that must develop inevitably; it is something that we must choose and that we must achieve with the grace of God.

Amy mentioned the possibility that we might, contrary to our calling, create ugly or bad things, and even sometimes express not craftsmanship but craftiness. Other and various sinful impulses can also rob us of our creative strength. On the other hand, many times just creating something can give us a boost in the right direction. For example, I am learning not to be discouraged by the disorder of my messy house. Instead I can take joy from the chance to create order and space to replace — or at least reduce! — the chaos that so easily develops. But creating order out of chaos is huge. That seems like a good description of one aspect of the creative work God is always doing in our lives.

Met. Anthony says that the creative work he is primarily talking about is not the art and music and literature that we tend to think of right away,

…both of heart and intelligence, of skill and of hand, but is much more essential and also much more important because all the rest can flow from this basic source of creativeness but cannot derive from anything else.

So that here we are confronted with man, whom God has called and loved into existence, endowed with His image, launched into life, and when on the seventh day the Lord rested from his works, the seventh day will be seen as all the span of time that extends from the last act of creation on the part of God to the last day, the eighth day, the coming of the Lord, when all things will be fulfilled, all things will come to an end, reach their goal, and blossom out in glory. It is within this seventh day, which is the whole span of history, that the creativeness of man is to find its scope and its place.

And this is a wonderful call to us because each of us can be a creator within his own realm, within his mind and his soul, by making them pure and transparent to God, within his actions and life, and become what Christ said we are called to be: a light to the world, a light that dispels darkness, a light that, as in the beginning of creation is the beginning of a new day — that is, the beginning of a true newness and a new unfolding of the potentialities that are within us and around us.

Cindy is hosting a discussion of Edith Schaeffer’s The Hidden Art of Homemaking, which anyone is welcome to join, and this post was written as a contribution.

6 thoughts on “The beginning of a true newness

  1. Your last two posts also remind me of G.K. Chesterton and C.S. Lewis and the fact that we are made in God's image, i.e., that we create. Enjoyed your posts. I see we have some favorite authors in common. In fact, wouldn't it have been fun to know G.K. Chesterton!

    Thanks for stopping in today. Glad you enjoyed Hawes. We're huge fans of the Yorkshire Dales. πŸ™‚

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  2. We had a pastor-friend who admonished us much and often with the words, “Christ in you, the hope of glory.” Thank you for bringing him to mind.

    Hidden Art of Homemaking was one of my most favorite books because I loved the ways Edith Schaeffer encouraged us to be creative in the home. Fresh picked flowers on the kitchen table on or on the night stand by the bed is such a special way to be creative and to give joy to those who live in the home. I love your bouquet.

    Jody

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  3. “I can take joy from the chance to create order and space to replace — or at least reduce! — the chaos that so easily develops.”

    These words encouraged me.

    Your flowers are lovely. They inspire me to go outside tomorrow with my shears in hand. My rose bushes are blooming. πŸ™‚

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  4. thanks for this. i like the perspective,
    “For example, I am learning not to be discouraged by the disorder of my messy house. Instead I can take joy from the chance to create order and space to replace — or at least reduce! — the chaos that so easily develops. But creating order out of chaos is huge. That seems like a good description of one aspect of the creative work God is always doing in our lives.”

    yep. He's in the business of redemption. and we too can work redemptive acts upon our chaos! πŸ™‚

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