Trying to befriend borage.

Everyone I have ever talked to about borage tells me how it self-sows enthusiastically. The several plants I’ve set into my garden in the last few years all died without reproducing, almost without blooming. So today when I stopped by a favorite garden center I bought  one more plant… I might beg some from friends again, too, but I wanted to get on with trying.

I bought pansies and poppies and kale and pak choi… last night my friend Sophia gave me seeds and gardening gloves, so I’ll have plenty to do when the rain lets up.

On my way out to the car I noticed a large area near the lot that was planted with borage, and I walked over that way to admire. Of course, this borage was acting normally; it had spread hither and yon and bees were  busy drinking from the underside of the flowers as from umbrellas. I got my first bee picture of 2019 — at least, most of a bee. 🙂

I didn’t make my exit, though, until I’d also explored as far as the two rows of apples on the other side of the lot. This part of the county resembles the fields and vineyards I’m used to, in that yellow flowers are brilliant right now, between rows of trees or grapes, or along roadsides. But instead of the usual mustard, here there was sourgrass (oxalis) blooming for miles and miles.

I knew it was a tiny apple orchard through which I was picking my way, through the mud and dripping grasses (in my church clothes), because — squish! I looked down to see that I had stepped on an apple and broken through its tenderized skin to the thoroughly rotten insides.

The next time I show you a photo of borage,
I hope it will be of a robust plant in my own garden!

8 thoughts on “Trying to befriend borage.

  1. I have borage. My cousin in upstate NY dug up a clump a few years ago & it took awhile to establish itself, but has spread to a 3-4 foot area. I just adore their pinkish, bluish upside down blossoms. The bees do love them! Are you planning to use yours for tea?

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  2. I have been scared off from growing Borage by tales of the way it spreads. Its flowers look so delicate that I’m tempted anyway. But, what would I use it for?

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  3. I wonder why you are having such a hard time with borage? I have always thought it to be easy. Now do I have any? No not right now, but I will put it on my ever expanding list of things to grow in this garden of mine. Have a wonderful day today. I have a date with a hula hoe. 🙂

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  4. I hope you will be able to produce a flourishing borage plant in your garden too! It is such a captivating plant which attracts bees and creates curiosity from human garden visitors.

    I might give it a try again this year, but it will not flourish in our hot summers.

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